Gaynor Jones was
diagnosed with MS at
26-years-old and writes:
“No one told me how to
keep my symptoms at bay
so I assumed working full time and
eating generally well was OK.
“My consultant neurologist advised
me to move back up north so my
family could help me when I was
in a wheelchair. The NHS also just
prescribed me general painkillers,
anti-spasmodic drugs and/or disease
modifying treatment, none of which
make you any better, just hopefully
stops you getting any worse.

“The NHS physio simply prescribed me
the simple exercise of standing on my
tip toes 10 times daily, along with aids
such as the wheelchair and walking
stick.

“I felt I needed to do a lot more than
just standing on my toes, so after
looking at several local gyms I joined
M Club because they promised me a
personal trainer, and assigned Craig
Silkens to help me.

“At first I’m not sure if he knew where
my limitations were or how far he
could push me, but I’m open to any
help, and with Craig’s experience I put
my trust in him.

“I am now working on my core to
help my balance and posture, which
is something I never thought I’d be
able to do. I’m also lifting weights,
using the gym machines with absolute
confidence, and although walking
into the gym initially was a daunting
experience because of my elbow crutch
and unsure as to what people might
think, with my new found confidence
and self-belief, I don’t care.

“I am really starting to reap the
rewards – physically, aesthetically and
mentally. Craig has advised me on my
diet which has improved dramatically
and, in turn, has helped keep certain
unwanted symptoms at bay.

“I know that I have to push myself,
convincing my mind that my body
needs the gym, because if I don’t then
my body will go backwards and I’ll be
letting myself down, but in a weird
way I’d feel like I’m letting Craig down
because of the amount of time and
energy he has invested in me.

“I know that 18 years of having MS
will not reverse back in 18 weeks or 18
months, but seeing how far I’ve come
in the last several weeks under expert
guidance, I am genuinely very excited
about what the future holds for me
now.”

Gaynor is, without doubt, a project
of a client and every week I learn
something new about her condition,
but every week we also overcome a
hurdle.

This is down to Gaynor’s tenacity
and willing to experiment with new
training ideas and never giving up,
even when she’s exhausted.

For this I applaud her and say that
everyone reading this article should
take inspiration from it. Regardless of
your physical ability, we can all make
improvements to our health.
For further information on MS check
out www.mssociety.org.uk